Bringing New York Publishing to Muncie, Indiana

Kiley Neal, Sara Rae Rust, and Kam McBride at the first meeting of the Discovery 2013 Internship, which will give 11 Ball State students the chance to work directly with literary agents, authors, and other publishing professionals. Boo ya!

Kiley Neal, Sara Rae Rust, and Kam McBride at the first meeting of the Discovery 2013 Internship, which will give 11 Ball State students the chance to work directly with literary agents, authors, and other publishing professionals. Boo ya!

Thanks to a grant from the Discovery Group, I’ve hired 11 Ball State students for internships at this summer’s Midwest Writers Workshop. I want to tell you about it, so mosey on over to The Big Thing to learn more. They will be teaching literary citizenship to others. It’s really amazing.


Being a literary citizen means you’re always thinking about how you can “do some magic” for other writers.

John E.K. Carter

This video appeared on my subscription feed this morning, and it reminded me of Carolyn See’s step to making a literary life, “Do Some Magic.”

For those of you out there that haven’t read her wonderful book, Making a Literary Life: Advice for Writers and Other Dreamers, “Do Some Magic” is all about self-affirmation and creating a positive place in the world to exist.

As writers, or people who spend too much time in our own heads, I think it’s too easy to get down on ourselves. I’ve found myself many times saying inwardly, “Nope, this essay is no good. You just will never be as good a writer as your peers.” This kind of self-created negativity does no one any good, and creates nothing but frustration toward the writing process.

To break that cycle, it’s necessary to take the time to say, “Yes. I can do this. I…

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What we talked about in class this week

Week 3

Lit Cit class, January 24

Notes by the totally awesome Linda Taylor

Blogging and charming notes:

Realize that there is not a straight line into a job with a Creative Writing major. The classes you’re taking will give you multiple experiences.

Your blog is yours. Cathy had each person talk about what they blogged about, what changed when they understood it as more than an assignment but something that was theirs, and also what was happening with their charming notes.

Your blogs are works in progress, always will be. They’re like a portfolio. Let it change as your life becomes more complex. Okay to blog with information and resources people may need. They may find you when they Google a question that you have answered.

Find people who are maybe in the middle (that is, not super famous). They may be following someone famous and talking to each other. Find people who are interested in the same things but are still early in their career or a few years ahead of you. Look for kindred souls.

By the end of this semester, your experience of being on social media should be drastically different. You’re not a college whiner; you’re a professional. Put your ideas out there. Read things. Be a positive influence.

This is a class where you can talk about your dreams and hopes, your career aspirations, your interests, what you really care about.

If all you do is put your blog out there, it will just linger. Be sure to use your FB and Twitter account to let people know you’ve posted. Use tags. Make sure it’s “findable.” 

Because Cathy has a wider network, she wants to make those in her network aware of your blogs. Realize that when you write your blog, you’re writing to more than just a few friends. It’s out there and many other types of folks may read it—like Cathy’s friends who are fellow professors and other professionals.

It’s a good idea to put a photo of yourself on your blog. Let folks know what you look like. Inspires warm fuzzies.

You could go into business for yourself offering author solutions. Do you have a good camera? People need current photos of themselves for social media.

Good act of literary citizenship—find something you like, post it, talk about it. Like this. You’ve made it permanent. If someone later Googles that person, they may find your blog, and may then read that person’s work. Free advertising.

This week is all about “let’s be positive.” Next week, we’ll look at the dark side of Literary Citizenship re: Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad.

YOU MUST POST TO YOUR BLOG AT LEAST ONCE A WEEK, NO LATER THAN THE TIME CLASS BEGINS ON THURSDAY. YOU WILL LOSE POINTS IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO. THIS IS NOT NEGOTIABLE. 

We must all be involved in one thing to promote:

(1) In Print festival, happening in March (Mark Neely to come next week).

(2) Reading in April for National Poetry Month.

(3) Applying to a graduate program. Cathy will be talking about this.

This is real life stuff—not just online community. How can you help to make these events successful using your contacts and social media?

Also, in these small groups, make sure to read one another’s blogs in that group. We may not all be able to read everyone’s blogs, but read at least the folks in your group.

Idea: As we read Jennifer Egan for next week, esp. with regard to the last story, think of Prof. Michael Meyerhofer’s new book. It’s an ebook only. What might we be able to do as a class to take what we’re learning and make his book sell, say, 8,000 copies by the end of the semester? And if we did that, is that a good thing, the “right” thing to do? Is that “literary citizenship” or is that what Egan calls “parroting.”

Presentations:

Carolyn See by Jay Sheets

Austin Kleon by Jackson Eflin

How did Austin Kleon go from his creative writing program (where you are now) to being a big speaker and making money? He had a 9–5 job and did book-related jobs, but then his first book was on the newspaper poetry thing. Then he was able to start speaking and one thing led to another.

It’s good to share and give info away for free, but at some point you have to decide “Why am I doing all this? Will this turn into a book? Do I want to keep my day job? What might this lead to?”

The business world calls this “monetizing your online presence.” Cathy calls it “being very deliberate about what you give away for free.” If you want to give away your words for free forever, that’s totally up to you, but remember, you gotta pay the bills somehow.

Think about this: How do our ideal readers find out about books? Kleon is made for the social media generation; Carolyn See is not.

Is it a writer’s job to find a wider audience? Or to speak to your audience? Does this just happen? Perhaps you have a certain demographic but then it can spread. Perhaps it’s a case-by-case basis.

What happens when writers don’t show up on social media? Like Carolyn See. Literary people are probably more on FB than Twitter.

Comparisons between See and Kleon—both talk about pretending to be a writer, fake it till you make it. Both say to convince ourselves and give ourselves permission to do it. Both talked about figuring out who you are, but they had different approaches. Both talked about outside experiences.

Major difference: See said, “Keep it to yourself,” to wait to show your work till ready; Kleon says put it out there.

Sean Lovelace says you should always be growing. Every two years you should look back on your work and say, “That was so bad.” You should keep improving. Kleon would say, “Let people see that evolution.”

Age definitely seems to make a difference in the perspective on putting stuff “out there.” See became famous before she had to do all this stuff. Kleon realizes that the world is different now.

Can you be ambitious without being annoying? For example, American Idol. The people who did the best were confident without being divas.

Cathy thinks this is what See means by “Keep It To Yourself.” Not, “keep your work to yourself, be ashamed of it,” but rather, “Don’t talk about being a writer all the freaking time, how much you want to make it, blah blah blah.”

Cathy says: I used to bring it up being a writer all the time early on. Now I don’t as much—except of course on my blog, on social media, and even then, I try pretty hard to BE INTERESTED IN WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE DOING. I know I’m a writer. I don’t need to bring it up in conversation so that I’ll feel validated. Keeping it to yourself is, to me, way cooler.

From the books, people liked:

  • Side projects, I can do other things besides write.
  • Nothing is original, but those ideas can be reformed to be your own.
  • Praise file.
  • Quit picking fights, go make something.
  • Take care of yourself.
  • Stay out of debt.
  • Keep your day job.
  • Keep a calendar and log book.
  • Marry well.
  • Write the book you want to read.

Some of these “be boring” things are so important—real life. We should learn the art side and be creative, but life is life and there are vital things that we must do in order to be able to actually live a creative life.

Think about your writing life. Think about your relationships. Who gets it? Who gets you? Hang out with people who support your work, as See says.

Being a writer doesn’t mean you must have the word “writing” in your day job title. If you can have a solid job with a solid income and health insurance, etc., then you’re just not worried. You may find that you’re writing even more even though you have a full-time job. Be strong enough to have your day job and still call yourself a writer. You must be able to say that to yourself and be okay with it.

Where to live. Think about this. It’s not a bad thing to be out of Indiana for awhile, but you can create a literary life here. If you want a job in publishing, you need to go where the publishers are.

The period after college and graduate school is the “abyss.” Take the opportunity to go somewhere and experience life. You have to actively work to make connections when you go to a new place.

Realize that the writing life is not the life for getting rich. Say no to some things so that you can say yes later. Be willing to not have all the “stuff.” Be willing to say no. Figure out how to spend as little money as possible so that you can invent the life that you want.

For the couple years after college, if you don’t have a family to support and tons of bills to pay, what will it take for you to get your book written? Maybe that boring job is what you want to keep. Maybe that will get you started.

The five years after college are very important. You have to decide if the writing is something you care about enough to make sacrifices. You may realize that you don’t want to be a writer—there may be something else that’s sort of related or sort of not.

Be savvy about grad school—don’t just go in order to give your life meaning again by being in school. Be careful not to go deeply in debt.

 


Hey, there’s an award for Literary Citizenship!

Hey, there’s an award for Literary Citizenship

The blog Beyond the Margins (a great one for writers to follow) put out a call for nominations for what they called “The Above and Beyond Award,” and got fifty nominations…

…fifty of the most generous souls in the writing world: writers who have taught, mentored, published, connected, fostered, championed, edited, soft-shouldered – even paid bills — for other writers. It’s like finding a Map of the Mensches.

I know many of the names listed IRL or from Facebook/Twitter, but have to add two names:

  • Dinty Moore, whose daily writing quotes on Facebook and blog for Brevity have taught me much.
  • Lee Martin, whose blog posts on teaching and consistent praise for his students at Ohio State always make my day.

Note: these are not millennials. These are two guys who, like me, didn’t grow up with social media but have learned how to use it in a mindful, positive way. See, blogging and SM doesn’t have to be all about self-promotion and bragging on yourself, and it’s not just something the kids do.


The first time I encountered the term “literary citizenship”

It’s important to say this: I didn’t invent the term “literary citizenship.”

I first came across it in 2008 when Dinty Moore posted this link from the Brevity blog to Facebook, which linked back to Blake Butler’s blog.

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

Blake Butler, fictionist, blogged in a most excellent fashion recently about the need to be a positive karmic force in the world of literary citizenship.  What comes around, goes around, he reminds us.  Here’s an excerpt and a link to the full (albeit, oddly titled) post:


Here are some ways you can do more, outside of spending $$$.

(1) When you read something you like, in any form, write the author and tell them. You don’t have to gush or take forever. Just tell them you saw it, you read it, you liked it. It’s a supportive feeling. It’s better than not saying anything.

(2) Write reviews of books you like. Short review/long review, whatever. It’s not that hard. It takes a little work to think about it clearly, but what goes around comes around. You can’t expect to be recognized for your work if you aren’t recognizing others for…

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An Interview with Vouched Books founder Christopher Newgent

Ball State’s own literary citizen: Christopher Newgent, founder of Vouched, talks to Adam Robinson. 


Anna Leahy talks Lit Cit at Fiction Writers Review

Anna Leahy talks Lit Cit at Fiction Writers Review