The UIndy Publishing Internship Network (PLUS: A Call For More Presses/Journals)

What if all creative writing programs did this? What if instead of expecting our students to figure it out on their own, we gave them some stars to steer by?

Salvatore Pane

uindy-schwitzer-student-center-with-flowers

I’m so excited to announce that the UIndy English department will be teaming up with a large group of presses and journals over the next few years to offer our students onsite and offsite internships with organizations based in Los Angeles and Manhattan and hopefully everywhere else in between. This builds heavily off the work of Prof. Kevin McKelvey, and over the upcoming summer and fall, we’re placing our students into internships with Boss Fight Books, Braddock Avenue Books, and a host of other magazines and presses we shouldn’t announce just quite yet. I’m hoping to extend and build connections with other presses and journals over the coming months, and if you’re interested in having either an onsite or offsite intern in the fall, spring, or summer, please do not hesitate to contact me at panes@uindy.edu. This is an amazing opportunity for our students to get hands…

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Be a Literary Citizen, Get a Free House

writehouse_house_exterior_cleanup_homeCheck out the mission of Write-a-House:

Our mission is simple: to enliven the literary arts of Detroit by renovating homes and giving them to authors, journalists, poets, aka writers. It’s like a writer-in-residence program, only in this case we’re actually giving the writer the residence, forever.

And here’s the best part, how you get to keep the house: be a literary citizen.

The WAH Author-in-Residence will also be expected to:

  • contribute content to the WAH blog on a regular basis.
  • participate in local readings and other cultural events
  • use the home as their primary residence.
  •  In general, they will be responsible home owners, engaged neighbors, committed city residents and good literary citizens.

Apply for a residency and spread the word.


Lori May’s roundup on Literary Citizenship

On her blog, Journeys and Destinations, Lori May offers a roundup of links about Lit Cit.

In print. Online. Everything. Hooray!

That itself is literary citizenship!

She says:

I couldn’t be happier to see so much discussion of late on the topic of literary citizenship. This is a topic near and dear to me and one I’ve had the pleasure of discussing at a number of MFA programs and community writing events over the years. We can never discuss this topic too much. Our involvement in the community—as writers, as readers—only nets good, as far as I’m concerned. Whether helping a small press get off the ground through volunteer hours, or sharing a recommended read with a booklover at work, a little good goes a long way in fostering not only our literary and cultural communities, but our regular old day-to-day life as people.


Bringing New York Publishing to Muncie, Indiana

Kiley Neal, Sara Rae Rust, and Kam McBride at the first meeting of the Discovery 2013 Internship, which will give 11 Ball State students the chance to work directly with literary agents, authors, and other publishing professionals. Boo ya!

Kiley Neal, Sara Rae Rust, and Kam McBride at the first meeting of the Discovery 2013 Internship, which will give 11 Ball State students the chance to work directly with literary agents, authors, and other publishing professionals. Boo ya!

Thanks to a grant from the Discovery Group, I’ve hired 11 Ball State students for internships at this summer’s Midwest Writers Workshop. I want to tell you about it, so mosey on over to The Big Thing to learn more. They will be teaching literary citizenship to others. It’s really amazing.


Hey, there’s an award for Literary Citizenship!

Hey, there’s an award for Literary Citizenship

The blog Beyond the Margins (a great one for writers to follow) put out a call for nominations for what they called “The Above and Beyond Award,” and got fifty nominations…

…fifty of the most generous souls in the writing world: writers who have taught, mentored, published, connected, fostered, championed, edited, soft-shouldered – even paid bills — for other writers. It’s like finding a Map of the Mensches.

I know many of the names listed IRL or from Facebook/Twitter, but have to add two names:

  • Dinty Moore, whose daily writing quotes on Facebook and blog for Brevity have taught me much.
  • Lee Martin, whose blog posts on teaching and consistent praise for his students at Ohio State always make my day.

Note: these are not millennials. These are two guys who, like me, didn’t grow up with social media but have learned how to use it in a mindful, positive way. See, blogging and SM doesn’t have to be all about self-promotion and bragging on yourself, and it’s not just something the kids do.


An Interview with Vouched Books founder Christopher Newgent

Ball State’s own literary citizen: Christopher Newgent, founder of Vouched, talks to Adam Robinson. 


Matt Bell describes Lit Cit

Matt Bell describes Lit Cit