The UIndy Publishing Internship Network (PLUS: A Call For More Presses/Journals)

What if all creative writing programs did this? What if instead of expecting our students to figure it out on their own, we gave them some stars to steer by?

Salvatore Pane

uindy-schwitzer-student-center-with-flowers

I’m so excited to announce that the UIndy English department will be teaming up with a large group of presses and journals over the next few years to offer our students onsite and offsite internships with organizations based in Los Angeles and Manhattan and hopefully everywhere else in between. This builds heavily off the work of Prof. Kevin McKelvey, and over the upcoming summer and fall, we’re placing our students into internships with Boss Fight Books, Braddock Avenue Books, and a host of other magazines and presses we shouldn’t announce just quite yet. I’m hoping to extend and build connections with other presses and journals over the coming months, and if you’re interested in having either an onsite or offsite intern in the fall, spring, or summer, please do not hesitate to contact me at panes@uindy.edu. This is an amazing opportunity for our students to get hands…

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A Better Place For Readers

These are excellent questions: What are some books that you needed and didn’t know about? What are some books that you had that helped you figure things out? And how are you making sure that other people know how great they are?

Brittany Means

When we talk about Literary Citizenship, it seems like we say a lot about making the world a better place for writers, and getting people interested in books. Which they definitely should be. But maybe we should start talking about how to make the world a better place for readers too. Let me explain. As a kid, reading was such an important part of my life. I read on the toilet, at recess, when I should have been sleeping, during church.

ImageOne series that I loved with all of my heart was A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. What made it so great was that Violet Baudelaire, the oldest, was a girl like me and she was the one who was generally in charge, saving the day, fixing everything. As a kid who was also, incidentally, a girl, and someone not very in control of the events in her life…

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Be a Literary Citizen, Get a Free House

writehouse_house_exterior_cleanup_homeCheck out the mission of Write-a-House:

Our mission is simple: to enliven the literary arts of Detroit by renovating homes and giving them to authors, journalists, poets, aka writers. It’s like a writer-in-residence program, only in this case we’re actually giving the writer the residence, forever.

And here’s the best part, how you get to keep the house: be a literary citizen.

The WAH Author-in-Residence will also be expected to:

  • contribute content to the WAH blog on a regular basis.
  • participate in local readings and other cultural events
  • use the home as their primary residence.
  •  In general, they will be responsible home owners, engaged neighbors, committed city residents and good literary citizens.

Apply for a residency and spread the word.


Lori May’s roundup on Literary Citizenship

On her blog, Journeys and Destinations, Lori May offers a roundup of links about Lit Cit.

In print. Online. Everything. Hooray!

That itself is literary citizenship!

She says:

I couldn’t be happier to see so much discussion of late on the topic of literary citizenship. This is a topic near and dear to me and one I’ve had the pleasure of discussing at a number of MFA programs and community writing events over the years. We can never discuss this topic too much. Our involvement in the community—as writers, as readers—only nets good, as far as I’m concerned. Whether helping a small press get off the ground through volunteer hours, or sharing a recommended read with a booklover at work, a little good goes a long way in fostering not only our literary and cultural communities, but our regular old day-to-day life as people.


Roxane Gay on Literary Citizenship

Over at the AWP site, Roxane Gay offers eight questions writers should ask themselves.

One of them is: Are you a good literary citizen?

Good literary citizenship can also extend to how you comport yourself when participating in social networks. Are you relentless in promoting your own writing, sharing the same link more than two or three times? Do you send direct messages or private Facebook messages to strangers, promoting your latest project? Of course you should promote your work but take care in how you promote your work and consider sharing the good news about the writing of others, if you are so moved.

Mostly, literary citizenship is the importance of remembering that no one is alone in the writing world. Conduct yourself as such.

Read the whole essay here. It’s awesome.


Stephanie Vanderslice on Literary Citizenship

vanderslice_stephanieOver at the Ploughshares blog, Stephanie Vanderslice talks to Tasha Golden about teaching Literary Citizenship and other “professionalization” topics in MFA programs. Good stuff!

She says:

The two central myths are one, that literary citizenship is all about self-promotion, and two, that it’s connected deeply to the “marketplace.” For example, a lot of students (and a lot of authors who clutter my Twitter feed with tweets about their own publications and nothing else) think that literary citizenship and platform-building means nothing more than promoting their own work.

In reality, it’s about completely saturating yourself in the literary culture—and then curating and promoting the work that interests you, so that other people will find it and care about it as much as you do.


The MFA and Jobs

I really like this post. I think it speaks to what I’ll call “Literary Citizenship Burnout.” And how important it is to find your own way of feeling “connected,” or why you might need to disconnect as well. Very honest description of what creative writing students face once they’re out of school.